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European reset on climate change, Signs point to global recession, and more

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European reset on climate change, Signs point to global recession, and more

THE WEEKEND REVIEW 

Latest opinion and analysis from OMFIF around the world

2-6 December 2019, Vol.10 Ed.49
Most-Read Commentary
European reset on climate change: A ‘green deal for Europe’ is building momentum following massive public support for more radical action on climate change. The stage is set for a policy realignment linking Britain and the EU after the UK election on 12 December. The opportunity has moved closer following a seminal shift in German politics, writes David Marsh.
Meeting

Ensuring financial stability at a time of high global debt: Against a backdrop of high global debt and political uncertainty, Jon Cunliffe, deputy governor for financial stability at the Bank of England, will set out at a seminar on Wednesday 15 January in London how monetary policy can be implemented to ensure financial stability. Read more.

Commentary

Cutting ECB inflation target ill-advised: New ECB President Christine Lagarde has launched a strategic review of monetary policy. This is a welcome initiative. However, some analysts and governing council members are calling for lowering the ECB’s inflation target of ‘close to, but below 2%.’ Doing so is ill-advised, writes Mark Sobel. Read more.

Commentary

Signs point to global recession: Market exuberance has begotten years of reckless lending. Although many factors point towards an impending global economic recession, markets and policy-makers seem remarkably sanguine. The possibility of a violent repricing of risky assets is apparently far from their minds, writes Desmond Lachman. Read more.

Meeting

Low interest rates and the new normal: Patrick Harker, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, and Roc Armenter, its vice-president and economist, will discuss the Fed’s balance sheet and long-term policy normalisation at a roundtable meeting in New York on Wednesday 15 January. Read more.

 

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