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Why the ECB must keep its monetary pillar, Mark Sobel’s 2020 predictions, and more

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Why the ECB must keep its monetary pillar, Mark Sobel’s 2020 predictions, and more

THE WEEKEND REVIEW

Latest opinion and analysis from OMFIF around the world

13-17 January 2020, Vol.11 Ed.1

Most-Read Commentary

ECB must keep its monetary pillar: The European Central Bank’s two pillars of monetary policy are set for performance appraisals, writes Chris Papadopoullos. The first, economic analysis, is popular. The second, monetary analysis, could be expelled. Yet it has become more important in recent years because of its ability to analyse and guide unconventional policy.
Commentary

US drops China ‘manipulator’ tag: On presidential orders and defying its own criteria, the Treasury designated China for currency ‘manipulation’ in August. In its latest foreign exchange report, it had to justify that unwarranted decision, and offer a rationale to reverse it, writes Mark Sobel. It coincides with phase one of Trump’s deal with China. Read more.

Podcast

Gold and the global reserve currency system: Michael Kitson, assistant director of the Centre for Business Research at the University of Cambridge, and Tatiana Fic, director of central banks and public policy at the World Gold Council, join OMFIF’s Pierre Ortlieb to discuss the state of the gold market and renminbi internationalisation. Listen.

Commentary

From new normal to new mediocrity: Pundit predictions for the 2020 global economy abound, writes Mark Sobel. A consensus exists – global growth will be underwhelming and flattish; the dollar may weaken a bit but remain firm; asset prices may do somewhat well; and bond yields could go back up a bit. Read more.

Commentary

2020s will test leaders’ conviction: It is questionable whether world leaders can find the vision to tackle key challenges, says Mark Sobel. The US policy course will hinge in part on forthcoming presidential elections. Europe offers little ground for cheer. Reform may be hampered in China, despite its greater capacity to institute change. Read more.

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