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Bidenomics versus Trumponomics, Future of commodity trading in the US, and more

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Bidenomics versus Trumponomics, Future of commodity trading in the US, and more

THE WEEKEND REVIEW   –    OMFIF

Latest opinion and analysis from OMFIF around the world

12-16 October 2020, Vol.11 Ed.40

Bidenomics versus Trumponomics: Whoever wins the US presidential election will face putting America’s economic house in order as a priority.

To understand what that path might look like – whether President Trump stays in office or Joe Biden is elected – it is helpful to consider each campaign’s economic policies.

Trump’s proposals would add $4.95tn to the debt through 2030.

The Biden plan would contribute to a $5.6tn deficit over the same period.

It is ‘Bidenomics’, and not ‘Trumponomics’, that will result in a stronger economy, writes Marsha Vande Berg.

Read more.

Podcast

Future of commodity trading in the US: Heath Tarbert, chairman and chief executive of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, joins Mark Sobel to discuss the CFTC’s work in managing the Covid-19 crisis, its current and future priorities, cross-border co-operation and the role of financial regulation. Listen to the recording.

Podcast

Brexit — what next?: Peter Foster, public policy editor at the Financial Times, and David Marsh, OMFIF chairman, discuss the consequences of the internal market bill for the Brexit negotiations. They assess the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit and what shape the EU-UK relationship could take after 31 December. Listen to the recording.

Commentary

Hope for UK house prices: Mortgages account for almost half of UK banks’ sterling assets and two-thirds of lending to the private sector. Policy-makers will have been reassured by data showing that the housing market bounced back from the pandemic. However, a major concern will be unemployment, writes Chris Papadopoullos. Read more.

Commentary

German cycles give a better ride: Britain has left the European Union — and is celebrating the occasion by adopting Germanic labour market policies. However, implanting German policies in the UK without appropriate supporting infrastructure is unlikely to be successful, writes Bob Bischof. Read more.

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