Home » How the ECB learned to love proportionality, In conversation with Hank Paulson and more

How the ECB learned to love proportionality, In conversation with Hank Paulson and more

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How the ECB learned to love proportionality, In conversation with Hank Paulson and more

The weekend Review – OMFIF

Latest opinion and analysis from OMFIF around the world

29 June-3 July 2020, Vol.11 Ed.25 

Most-Read Commentary

How the ECB learned to love proportionality: The ECB, moving quickly to defuse the German constitutional dispute over government bond purchases, is stepping up its commitment to ‘proportionality’ in policy actions. The ECB and the Bundesbank have worked with the German government and parliament in the past few days, releasing 300 pages of previously secret documents. The combined action lifts a threatened court ban on Bundesbank participation in ECB bond-buying, writes David Marsh.

Video

In conversation with Hank Paulson: As the world adjusts to the Covid-19 pandemic, US policy-makers and market participants look to the challenges ahead. Hank Paulson, former US Secretary of the Treasury, joins OMFIF’s Mark Sobel to analyse the US’ position in the global economy now and in the future. Watch.

Podcast

Central bank gold reserves: Kurtulus Taskale Diamondopoulos, director of central banks and public policy at the World Gold Council, joins Pierre Ortlieb of OMFIF to discuss the WGC’s annual central bank gold survey in the broader context of gold reserves management amid the coronavirus pandemic. Listen.

Commentary

Wirecard scandal raises need for common EU market rule Crises, historians have noted, can unblock institutional changes which are impeded by cultural factors. Hopefully this will happen in the case of Wirecard, the Munich-based payments giant struggling for survival after admitting a multiyear, multibillion fraud in its balance sheet, writes Ignazio Angeloni. Read more.

Commentary

Don’t lose sleep over government debt: The blow-out in fiscal deficits around the world triggered by the Covid-19 pandemic is leading many to ask: how are we going to pay for all of this? The size of the budget deficit should be driven by how far from full employment the economy is and how much inflationary pressure there is, writes Paul Sheard. Read more.

 

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