Home Banking Five risks as Britain enters dangerous waters, Digital currency and the new cold war, and more

Five risks as Britain enters dangerous waters, Digital currency and the new cold war, and more

by admin

Five risks as Britain enters dangerous waters, Digital currency and the new cold war, and more

THE WEEKEND REVIEW

OMFIF

Latest opinion and analysis from OMFIF around the world

7-11 September 2020, Vol.11 Ed.35

Most-Read Commentary

Five risks as Britain enters dangerous waters: The UK government is venturing into highly dangerous waters with its declared intention to ‘break international law’ in redrawing the agreement on leaving the EU. The episode, with strong overtones of Johnson’s 2019 judicial clash over suspending parliament, underlines the prime minister’s recklessness on matters vitally affecting Britain’s strategic weight in the world. His palpable inability to steer his government consistently in a strategically viable direction brings him risks on multiple fronts, write David Marsh and John Orchard.

Read more.

Podcast

Japan’s outlook post Abenomics: Jun Saito, senior research fellow at the Japanese Centre for Economic Research, and Kotaro Tamura, adjunct professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy and formerly a member of Japan’s House of Councillors, discuss the outlook for the Japanese economy and priorities for the country’s next leader. Listen to the recording.

Interview

The end of independent central banks: Germany needs a Macron figure, able to communicate the benefits of the euro area, as its next chancellor. David Marsh, chairman of OMFIF, explains why as well as his fears over central bank independence, the return of inflation and why the euro area still needs to change, in an interview with Der Spiegel. Read more.

Commentary

Lane’s currency faux pas: With the seemingly innocuous observation that the euro-dollar rate ‘does matter’ for monetary policy, European Central Bank Chief Economist Philip Lane unleashed a bout of foreign exchange market turmoil, perceived by some as talking down the euro, writes Mark Sobel. Read more.

Commentary

Digital currency and the new cold war: Just as the US Treasury was mailing out physical stimulus cheques, the People’s Bank of China began testing of a digital currency in four cities. Future economists will look back on these counterpoints as the start of the digital currency era, writes David Birch. Read More.

 

You may also like

Leave a Comment