Home NewsComment Green bonds dispel ‘niche market’ status, Superpowers posturing in volatile Gulf, and more

Green bonds dispel ‘niche market’ status, Superpowers posturing in volatile Gulf, and more

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The Straits of Hormuz

Green bonds dispel ‘niche market’ status, Superpowers posturing in volatile Gulf, and more

THE WEEKEND REVIEW

Latest opinion and analysis from OMFIF around the world

20-24 January 2020, Vol.11 Ed.2

Most-Read Commentary

Superpowers posturing in volatile Gulf: It was once conventional wisdom that the US had a near-vital interest in keeping open the strait of Hormuz, the slender shipping lane dividing Iran and Oman. But the US has become less dependent on the Gulf for oil, and Washington’s geopolitical interest in the region seems to have waned, writes Joergen Oerstroem Moeller.
Commentary

Green bonds dispel ‘niche market’ status: There is a long way to go before green bonds become a separate asset class of their own, and monetary policy-makers have the responsibility to play a role in supporting this market segment. Magyar Nemzeti Bank aims to lead by example, write Dániel Palotai and István Veres. Read more.

Podcast

Ahead of the ECB: Francesco Papadia, senior fellow at Bruegel and former director general for market operations at the European Central Bank, joined OMFIF’s Marcin Stepan, to discuss the euro area’s macroeconomic outlook, the strategic review of ECB monetary policy, and how policy-makers can help combat climate change. Listen.

The Bulletin

Eurovision: More than 60 years ago, Charles de Gaulle said, ‘From the Atlantic to the Urals, it is Europe… that will decide the fate of the world.’ Today, putting its own affairs in order, rather than deciding ‘the fate of the world’, is at the top of Europe’s agenda. At its outset, 2020 seems like the beginning of a new era for the old continent. Read more.

Commentary

US currency monitoring list needs rethink: Treasury should review the structure and integrity of its ‘enhanced analysis’ framework to bolster the credibility of its foreign exchange report, writes Mark Sobel. It should use more judgement to avoid an overly mechanistic application, especially when the results are curious Read more.

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