Home Markets Xeneta’s quarterly Ocean Deep Dive report has just been released.

Xeneta’s quarterly Ocean Deep Dive report has just been released.

by admin
Peter Sand

I am pleased to share with you a summary of the June edition, of this customer-only report.

This is the link to it: https://hubs.ly/Q01fvZTM0

Here are some extracts:

Overview

Shippers on the major trades are seeing spot rates and premium surcharges fall in many trades. Getting capacity allocations is becoming easier, and carriers are starting to adjust to no longer being all-mighty. However, freight rates are still high. Global spending on shipping will be record high this year, and congestion and delays continue to plague shippers on several major trades.

Expect Intra-Asian Knock-On Effects From Lockdowns To Outbound Trades This Autumn

On the world’s largest trade, namely intra-Asia, container volumes in the first four months of the year are up by 1.6%, which is a considerable slowdown on this trade compared to 9.1% growth in 2021.

The interconnectedness of Far Eastern supply chains means that slowing volumes on this trade are evidence of the region’s slowdown in manufacturing and production.

Are Long-Term Rates Peaking?

On the long-term market, the average rate out of the Far East has continued to rise, up by USD 600 per FEU since January on 1 June, and fast closing in on the spot market, something that has already happened on several of the major global trades. Of these top 6 trades out of the Far East, four of them have average long-term rates above those on the spot market, split evenly between intra-regional and longer haul trades.

On the long-term market, the average rate out of the Far East has continued to rise, up by USD 600 per FEU since January on 1 June, and fast closing in on the spot market, something that has already happened on several of the major global trades.

Get The Mix Right To Benefit From Falling Spot Rates

Many shippers witnessing the falling spot market and hearing from within their company and the broader industry about falling freight rates, will be looking at their long-term contracts to see how, if at all, they can find a way to benefit from the situation.

Retail Sales in US Holds Up – For Now

Behind the falling number of containers being shipped is the broader global economy and many countries moving towards a post-pandemic reality.

Deteriorating Macroeconomics in Europe And China

 The economy in the European Union is much less dependent on consumer spending than the US economy, but here the cost-of-living crisis is being felt. In March, retail sales in the European Union were up only 1.7% (and just 0.8% in the eurozone), which with inflation explains the 2.3% fall in total container imports to Europe in the first four months of the year.

Carriers Paying Less for Charter Tonnage – For Now

Despite the overall falling trend, charter rates remain far above breakeven levels, even for the oldest, most inefficient ships with the highest voyage costs. Ship-owners wouldn’t choose to send a ship to be demolished if they can continue to earn money on it.

This explains the total lack of demolition this year. Charter rates need to come much further down before it is only the ships that really can’t sail anymore start to be demolished.

Any questions and comments are welcome.

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